Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

    Berberis vulgaris

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    berberis vulgaris, L

    Etymology

    Berberis from sanscrit "varvarata" means "rough, coarse"; someone says from arabic "barbar"  that means shiny

    Family

    Berberidaceae

    Traditional name

    Ita: Crespino
    English: Pipperidge bush; French: Epine - vinette;

    German: Berberitze

    Used parts

    Bark of the root.

    Classification

    Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Polycarpicae (Magnoliidae); Ranunculales; Berberidaceae - Barberry Family

    Keywords

    Original proving

    Introduced into homoeopathic practice in 1835 by Dr. Hesse, Bib. Hom. de Gen. V. 46; Allen's Encyclop. Mat. Med. Vol. II, 139.

    Description of the substance

    The foto is taken from Wikipedia (7/11), the author kindly released it into the public domain (License: see here).

     

    The leaves of the barren shoots of the year are alternate, 1 to 1 1/2 inch long, shortly petioled, presenting various gradations from leaves into spines, into which they become transformed in the succeeding year. The primary leaves on the woody shoots are reduced to three-forked spines, with an enlarged base. The secondary leaves are in fascicles from the axil of these spines and are simple, oval, tapering at the base into a short foot-stalk, the margins finely serrate, with the teeth terminating in small spines.

    The flowers are small, pale yellow, arranged in pendulous racemes, produced from the fascicles of leaves, towards the ends of the branches. Their scent is not altogether agreeable when near, but by no means offensive at a distance. Their stamens show remarkable sensibility when touched springing and taking a position closely applied to the pistil. Insects of various kinds are exceedingly fond of the Barberry flower. Linnaeus observed that when bees in search of honey touch the filaments, they spring from the petal and strike the anther against the stigma, thereby exploding the pollen. In the original position of the stamens, Iying in the concavity of the petals, they are sheltered from rain, and there remain till some insect unavoidably touches them. As it is chiefly in fine, sunny weather that insects are on the wing, the pollen is also in such weather most fit for the purpose of impregnation, hence this curious contrivance of nature for fertilizing the seeds at the most suitable moment.

    The leaves are also acid, and have sometimes been employed for the same purposes as the fruit. Gerard recommends the leaves 'to season meat with and instead of a salad.'

    Cows, sheep and goats are said to eat the shrub, horses and swine to refuse it, and birds, also, seldom touch the fruit, on account of its acidity; in this respect it approaches the tamarind.