Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

    Cahinca racemosa

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    Chiococca racemosa (L). Jacq.

    Etymology

    = Chiococca racemosa

    The generic name "Chiococca" is derived from the Greek words[4] χιών (chion), meaning "snow" and κόκκος (kokkos), meaning "kernel" or "berry."[5][6]

    Family

    Traditional name

    Used parts

    Tincture of the root.

    Classification

    Rubiaceae

    Keywords

    Original proving

    First proven by Dr. Kock, Sr.

    Description of the substance

    A somewhat climbing shrub, with a round, branched root, and a stem 8 to 12 feet high, arborescent, with branches opposite. The leaves are, ovate, pointed, and smooth, with an uninterrupted margin; the stipules are short, pointed, and joined together at the base. The flowers are white, without odor, but subsequently become yellowish and redolent, and are borne in short, axillary, 1-sided racemes. The calyx is 5-cleft; the corolla funnel-shaped; the stamens 5. The fruit is a small, roundish, compressed, white berry. The C. anguifuga, Martius, and C. densifolia, Martius, are varieties possessing similar properties.
    History and Description.-This plant, sometimes called Snowberry, is a native of the West Indies, South America, and also of the sea-coast of Florida. In Brazil the root is known as "raiz pretta" (black root). In that country the roots of Chiococca anguifuga, Martins, and Chiococca densifolia, Martius, are employed under the names cainana and caninana. The root as found in commerce, is in small round pieces of different sizes and lengths, flexuous, with longitudinal rugae and a few rough spots, and brownish-black or grayish-brown, having its thin, cortical portion of a reddish-brown color, fragile, of a disagreeable odor, and a coffee-like taste, succeeded by a pungent nauseousness; its internal, woody portion is without taste. The bark is the medicinal part, and yields its properties to water or alcohol.


    Botanical Source.—A somewhat climbing shrub, with a round, branched root, and a stem 8 to 12 feet high, arborescent, with branches opposite. The leaves are, ovate, pointed, and smooth, with an uninterrupted margin; the stipules are short, pointed, and joined together at the base. The flowers are white, without odor, but subsequently become yellowish and redolent, and are borne in short, axillary, 1-sided racemes. The calyx is 5-cleft; the corolla funnel-shaped; the stamens 5. The fruit is a small, roundish, compressed, white berry. The C. anguifuga, Martius (more), and C. densifolia, Martius (more), are varieties possessing similar properties.

    History and Description.—This plant, sometimes called Snowberry, is a native of the West Indies, South America, and also of the sea-coast of Florida. In Brazil the root is known as "raiz pretta" (black root). In that country the roots of Chiococca anguifuga, Martins, and Chiococca densifolia, Martius, are employed under the names cainana and caninana. The root as found in commerce, is in small round pieces of different sizes and lengths, flexuous, with longitudinal rugae and a few rough spots, and brownish-black or grayish-brown, having its thin, cortical portion of a reddish-brown color, fragile, of a disagreeable odor, and a coffee-like taste, succeeded by a pungent nauseousness; its internal, woody portion is without taste. The bark is the medicinal part, and yields its properties to water or alcohol.