Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

    Caulophyllum thalictroides

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    Caulophyllum thalictroides

    Etymology

    Kanha, kaulos, a stem; and 0bllov, phyllon, a leaf, the stem resembling the petiole of a large leaf.

    Family

    Traditional name

    English:Blue Cohosh, Squaw Root, Blueberry Root, Leontice, Pappoose Root

    Used parts

    A TINCTURE OF THE FRESH ROOT

    Classification

    Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Polycarpicae (Magnoliidae); Ranunculales; Berberidaceae - Barberry Family

    Keywords

    Original proving

    It has only had one proving, that by Dr. Burt, the majority of the indications having been derived from tradition and clinical experience.

    Description of the substance

    This erect, perennial herb, attains a growth of from 1 to 2 - 1/2 feet. Root horizontal or contorted, wrinkled and branched, showing many upright nodules, bearing at their summits the scars of previous stems, and giving off numerous cylindrical, branching rootlets from the older portions. Stem simple, glaucous when young, smooth when cold, arising from several imbricate, membranous scales. Leaves large, triternately decompound, the upper much smaller and biternate (pl. 16, fig. 1); leaflets 2 to 3 lobed, obtusely wedge - shape at the base; petioles blending with the stem in such a manner as to render their junction almost obscure. Inflorescence a loose raceme or panicle; peduncle arising from the base of the upper leaf; flowers purplish or yellowish - green. Sepals 6, oval - oblog, with 3 small bractlets at the base. Petals 6, gland - like, with a short claw and a somewhat reniform or hooded body, the whole much smaller than the sepals, at the base of which they are inserted. Stamens 6, overlaying, and about the same length as the petals; anthers oblong, 2 - celled, the cells opening by uplifting valves. Pistils gibbous; ovary resembling the anthers in form, 2 - celled; style short, apical; stigma minute, unilateral. Fruit a 2 - seeded pod; epicarp thin, papyraceous, bursting and withering before fertilization is complete, leaving the naked seeds to farther develop upon their erect, thick funiculi; pericarp fleshy, deep blue; albumen corneous; embryo minute, apical.
         
    History and Habitat.
    The Blue Cohosh is indigenous to the United states, growing abundantly in moist, rich woods, from Canada southward to Kentucky and the Carolinas. It blossoms from April to May, before the full development of the leaves. The berries are mawkish, insipid, and without special flavor. The seeds are said to resemble coffee when roasted.

    Botanical Information:  A perennial herb with thickened root - stocks, stem up to 1 meter in height with a large triternate almost sessile leaf near the summit and smaller usually biternate leaf near the base of the panicle; leaflets oval to obovate, 3 - 5 lobed, 2.5 - 10 cm long. Flowers in terminal panicles, yellow green, 1.25 cm across; sepals, petals and stamens 6; pistil 1 with short style and unilateral stigma; petals forming head and smaller than sepals; seeds 8 mm thick, blue black.
         Macroscopical: Rhizome branched crooked of horizontal growth from 7 to 25 cm long and from 5 to 15 mm thick, showing on its upper surface broad cup shaped stem scars and short bases of stems and on all surfaces, tough and wiry rootlets matted together, dusty brown to light yellowish brown fracture tough and woody, internally light brown to yellowish brown with a waxy lustre; bark thin, wood with numerous small wood wedges separated by narrow medullary rays and enclosing a broad pith.
         Microscopical: (Powdered): Pale brown to light yellowish orange. It shows fragments of yellowish brown cork, tracheids with bordered pores (pits) upto 50 u in diameter, fragments of wood fibres and trachieds with bordered pores; fragments of starchy parenchyma, and numerous more or less spheroidal starch grains upto 18 u in diameter. (Pharmacopea).

    The Blue Cohosh is indigenous to the United states, growing abundantly in moist, rich woods, from Canada southward to Kentucky and the Carolinas. It blossoms from April to May, before the full development of the leaves. The berries are mawkish, insipid, and without special flavor. The seeds are said to resemble coffee when roasted.
         The aborigines found in Caulophyllum their most valuable parturient; an infusion of the root, drank as tea, for a week or two preceding confinement, rendering delivery rapid and comparatively painless. They also used the root as a remedy for rheumatism, dropsy, uterine inflammation, and colic (Raf.). These uses have been proven reliable by all methods of practice since.
         The root is officinal in the U. S. Ph. The preparations in the Eclectic Materia Medica are:  Extractum Caulophylli Alcoholicum ,  Resina Caulophylli , and  Tinctura Caulophylli Composita . (Caulophyllum, Secale, Polygonum, and Oil of Sabina. (Millspaugh’s Medicinal Plants).

    Habitat: U.S.A., from Canada to Carolina and Kentucky. (Pharmacopea).