Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

    Cichorium intybus

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    Cichorium intybus, Linn.

    Etymology

    From the Greek kikhorion; its ancient Latin name, cichorium intybus means "January plant" or "winter salad."

    Family

    Traditional name

    Chicory.
    Cicoria
    Wild Chicory
     Belgian endive, French endive , chicon, witloof chicory, and Italian dandelion.

    Used parts

    Allen Enc.:Trituration or tincture of the dried root.

    Classification

    Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Asteridae / Synandrae; Asterales; Compositae / Asteraceae - Composites / Daisy or Sunflower Family

    Keywords

    Original proving

    Clarcke Dict.: It has been proved, and the following symptoms have been observed

    Description of the substance

    Chicory is the common name given to the flowering plants in genus Cichorium of the family Asteraceae. There are two cultivated species, and four to six wild species.

    Common chicory (Cichorium intybus) is a bushy perennial herb with blue or lavender flowers. Originating from Europe, it was naturalized in North America, where it has become a roadside weed. The roots are baked, ground, and used as a coffee substitute and additive in the plant's Mediterranean region of origin, although its use as a coffee additive is still very popular in the American South, particularly in New Orleans. Common chicory is also known as blue sailors, succory, and coffeeweed. The plant is cultivated and used as endive under the common names radicchio, Belgian endive, French endive, or witloof. It is grown in complete darkness to keep new leaves tender and pale.

    True endive (Cichorium endivia) is a species of chicory which is specially grown and used as a salad green. It has a slightly bitter taste and has been attributed with herbal properties. Curly endive and the broad-leafed escarole are true endives.

    Cichorium is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Setaceous Hebrew Character and Turnip Moth.