Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

    Cotyledon umbilicus

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    Umbilicus rupestris

    Etymology

    The name Cotyledon is derived from Gr.  kotyle,  a cup, alluding to its round, slightly concave leaves. Umbilicus refers to the navel-like depression in the centre of the leaves.

    Family

    Traditional name

    Other Names:  Umbilicus pendulinus. Le Nombril de Venue. House-leek family. (Murphy Homeopathic Materia Medica). Stonecrop Family. (Wichman)
    Common Names:  Pennywort. Navelwort. Kidneywort.

    Used parts

    Homeopathic preparation:  Tincture of the plant.

    Classification

    N.O.  Subclass: Rosidae; Order: Rosales; Family: Crassulaceae or Sedum Family

    Keywords

    see ferrum phosphoricum

    Original proving

    Provings:  Allen: Cyclopoedia, V. 3. Possart: Hom. Arz., pt. 1.
         Craig: Brit. Jl. Hom. V. 11, p. 589. A. H. Z., V. 47, pp. 77, 85.
         - - - - -: Hom Viertelj., V. 5, pt. 1, p. 57.
         Creasote. See Kreasotum. (Bradford’s Index).

    Description of the substance

    Botanical Information:  The Crassulaceae is a widespread plant family consisting of 37 genera of succulent herbs and subshrubs, of which Sedum and Sempervivum are well known. Like Cacti, they don't open their pores during the hot daylight hours, when there would be high rates of water loss, but instead open during the cool night hours to permit the entry of carbon dioxide, which is converted into organic acids that accumulate within the plant and are then converted back to carbon dioxide to be used in photosynthesis the following day.
         The name Cotyledon is derived from Gr.  kotyle,  a cup, alluding to its round, slightly concave leaves. Umbilicus refers to the navel-like depression in the centre of the leaves. Some of the English names of the plant, Wall Pennywort, Wall Pennyroyal and Penny Pies, are references to the round form of the leaf suggesting a coin. Most Cotyledon species are native to South Africa, needing sun, well-drained soil and a temperature which does not fall below 5-10o C. The thick succulent leaves are frequently pale green with a mealy covering. In poor soil and dry conditions these often colour up red.  C. umbilicus  is an insignificant, hardy, evergreen plant about 20 centimetres tall. Its rootstock is a small, roundish tuber. The yellow-green, small ray flowers grow in long, hanging bunches. Used in the past for epilepsy as Folia Umbilicus Veneris. A close relative,  Sedum , was also used in epilepsy. The name is probably linked to this use, as it comes from L.  sedare , to still. The Romans planted Sedum species in their roof gardens and believed that it protected them against lightning.
         Proved by Craig on 11 persons in the middle of the 19th century. Hale didn't attach much importance to it. "I am surprised that so many important symptoms were caused by an insignificant plant. I more than suspect the imagination of the provers called them up, like the phantasmagoria which float through Houat's notorious pathogenesis."
         As if the size of a plant were a criterion! (Vermeulen’s Synoptic ll)

    Habitat: The plant grows on rocks and in cracks in the Mediterranean-Atlantic region from Madeira to Asia Minor, but also occurs in more northern regions, such as Ireland and England. (Vermeulen’s Synoptic ll)