Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Euphorbia resinifera

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Euphorbium  resinifera

Etymology

The Euphorbiaceae are named after Euphorbus, physician to Juba, King of Mauritania. According to tradition, this doctor was the first to use the sap from the Euphorbiaceae for medicinal purposes.

Family

Traditional name

Other Names:  E. resinifera. E. tenella. E. polygonum.
Common Names:  Gum Euphorbium. Wolf’s Milk. - Poisonous gum thistle, Dergmuse, Darkmous, Euphorbium bush, Gun euphorbium.

Used parts

Homeopathic preparation:  Tinct. of the gum resin.

Classification

Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Rosiflorae / Rosidae; Euphorbiales; Euphorbiaceae - Spurge Family

Keywords

Original proving

Allen: Cyclopoedia, V. 4, V. 10. . Hering: Guid. Symptoms, V. 5.

Description of the substance

Botanical Information:  Euphorbia resinifera is a cactus-like plant of the Euphorbiacae. The resinous exudation or juice of Euphorbia resinifera is exported from Morocco. (Clarke’s Dictionary).

  The Euphorbiaceae are named after Euphorbus, physician to Juba, King of Mauritania. According to tradition, this doctor was the first to use the sap from the Euphorbiaceae for medicinal purposes.
     This huge plant genus consists of more than 1000 varieties of annual or perennial shrubs and trees, which are found in moderate and tropical areas. Most varieties have a milky, extremely pungent and very poisonous sap.
    
---Description---Resembling a cactus in appearance, this leafless perennial plant has a stem about 4 feet in height, and many branches. The flowers are small, simple, and bright yellow, and the fruit a small capsule with one seed in each cell. Specimens sent to Kew in 1870 have never flowered, but others have done so in Paris. Both Pliny and Dioscorides knew the drug, and its name is classical.
The milky juice is collected from incisions made in the fleshy branches, and is so acrid that it burns the fingers. It flows down the stems and encrusts them as it hardens in the sun. Poor Arabs bring in the resinous masses for sale in Morocco, whence it is chiefly exported from Mogador. The dust is so intensely irritant to the mucous membrane that the mouth and nose of those handling it must be covered by a cloth.
In commerce the drug is found in yellowish-brown 'tears' that have a waxy appearance. They are almost transparent, slightly aromatic only when heated, and often pierced with holes made by the prickles of the plant while drying. The taste is slight, but becomes very acrid.
It is said to be employed as an ingredient of paint used for preserving ships' bottoms.
At Mogador, the branches are used for tanning leather.




Habitat: This plant is found in the Canary Islands and in the northern parts of Africa, along the Atlas mountain range. (Hemple’s Materia Medica).