Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Gossypium

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Gossypium Herbaceum

Etymology

From the Latin gossypion; name used by Pliny for Gossypium arboreum, cotton tree; derived from Arabic qutn, cotton.

 

 

Family

Traditional name

Eng: Cotton

Ita: cotone

Germ: Baumwolle

Used parts

Tincture of Fresh roots.

Classification

Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Dilleniidae; Malvales; Malvaceae - Cotton / Mallow Family

 

Keywords

Original proving

Introduced in 1851, N.A.J. of Hom. I., 273; Allen: Encylop. Mat. Med., Vol., 458; X 538; Hering: Guiding Symptoms Vol. V, 435.

 

Description of the substance

Characteristics

 

Cotton is an annual, biennial or perennial plant, but in cultivation it is generally treated as an annual; herbaceous to short shrub or small tree - two to six feet tall. It consist of a primary axis, erect and branched with a vegetative lower zone having monopodial branches, and a fruiting upper zone with sympodial branches. The leaves of the cotton plant alternate, cordate petiolate, three to nine lobed and palmately veined, with varying size, texture, shape and hairiness. The large, showy, cream yellow, red or purple flowers are extra axillary, terminal, solitary, and borne on sympodial branches. The calyx (= collectively the sepals) consists of a very short cup-shaped structure at the base of the corolla. The five petals of the corolla are either free or slightly united at the base of the convoluted bud (Sundararaj, 1974).

 

Cotton belongs to Gossypium, a genus named by Linnaeus in the middle of the 18th century. The genus has been classified in both the Malvaceae or mallow family and the Bombacaceae families and in both the Hibsceae and Gossypieae tribes. Today, the genus seems firmly placed in the Malvales order, the Malvaceae family, and tribe Gossypieae, because of the uniqueness of the lysigenous glands found throughout species within the genus. These glands contain a number of sesquiterpenes, collectively called gossypol. Only those species of Gossypium producing seed hairs can accurately be called cotton (Smith, 1995).

 

The seed hairs are unicellular outgrowths of the epidermis of the seed, or seed coat, and consist of a thin primary wall and a secondary cellulose wall, which develops after primary growth of the plant has ceased. In commercial cotton, the hairs are of two types, lint and fuzz. Lint hairs are the cotton of commerce or the seed hairs suitable for spinning, and develop in a different way than cotton fuzz (Munro, 1987). Lint hairs are distinguishable by being convoluted or twisted. The deposit of cellulose in the cuticle is much less. When the capsule opens and the lint hairs dry, they collapse around their central hollow axis. The cellulose thickening is deposited in spirally arranged fibrillae. The spirals reverse directions at intervals so that they are present in the same hair in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions (Prentice, 1972). This causes the ribbon to twist, and these irregularly twisted ribbons cling together when spun into thread. This cling allows a strong thread to be produced from cotton, although the individual fibers are much shorter than those of wool or flax (Munro, 1987).

 

The fuzz hairs or linters are generally shorter, have a larger diameter, a smaller lumen and a much thicker cellulose deposit in the secondary wall which prevent the formation of twists when the cell dries out at maturity. This makes the fuzz unspinnable, but it is marketable for items such as upholstery stuffing and for the production of cellulose (Prentice, 1972).

Cotton is the principal raw material for the world's textile industry, but its dominant position is been systematically displaced by synthetic fibers. This, however, does not change the fact that cotton still has natural qualities that people prefer, such as comfort, softness, durability, and versatility that has maintain its position as the fabric of our lives.

Cotton is the principal raw material for the world's textile industry, but its dominant position is been systematically displaced by synthetic fibers. This, however, does not change the fact that cotton still has natural qualities that people prefer, such as comfort, softness, durability, and versatility that has maintain its position as the fabric of our lives.

Cotton is the principal raw material for the world's textile industry, but its dominant position is been systematically displaced by synthetic fibers. This, however, does not change the fact that cotton still has natural qualities that people prefer, such as comfort, softness, durability, and versatility that has maintain its position as the fabric of our lives.