Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Hepatica triloba

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Anemone hepatica (LINN.)

Etymology

Hepatica is an ancient remedy which received its name from a fancied resemblance of its leaves to the shape of the liver.
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The name of the genus may be derived from epatikos (affecting the liver) or from epar (the liver), from a likeness in its appearance to that organ

Family

Traditional name

Hepatica";"triloba:";"Chaix"
bl†sippa";"sinivuokko"
Liverwort
Hepatica nobilis (Anemone hepatica, Hepatica triloba), liverwort

Hepatica triloba. Hepatica triloba, var. americana or obtusa. Round-leaved Hepatica. Noble Liverwort. Liverleaf. Liverweed. Trefoil. Herb Trinity. Kidneywort. Edellebere

Used parts

Allen Enc.:Tincture of the full-grown leaves.

Classification

Ranuncolaceae; Hepatica

Keywords

Original proving

All our definite knowledge of its began with an experiment made by Dr. D. G. Kimball

Description of the substance

The foto is taken from Wikipedia, the author Jonas Bergsten kindly released it into the public domain (License: see here). Thank you very much!

 

The Hepaticas are distinguished by having carpels without feathery tails and by the involucre of three simple leaves being so close to the flower as to resemble a calyx.
The leaves are broad kidney or heart shaped, about 2 inches long and broad, with three broad, angular lobes, leathery, smooth and dark green above, almost evergreen, placed on long, slender foot-stalks growing direct from the root. In the wild state the flowers are generally blue, more rarely rose or white, but in cultivation many other tints are to be found. There are numerous garden varieties, growing best in deep loam or clay, several having double flowers.
The leaves should be gathered during flowering time in March.

Cultivation

Hepaticas are hardy, longlived plants of a deep-rooting nature, preferring a rich, porous soil and a sheltered situation. They flourish best in a deep loam, but will thrive in clay: one condition of success is good drainage. It is not advisable totransplant them frequently; when left undisturbed for a few years, they form fine clumps.
The double varieties are propagated by division of roots. The strongest clumps should be lifted immediately after flowering and carefully divided into separate crowns, each division to have as many roots as can be secured to it. These must be at once planted in fresh soil and carefully closed in, and then lightly covered with some very fine earth. They will become established in the course of the season if the soil is well drained, care being taken to water when necessary. Being by nature woodside plants, they should not be exposed to long-continued sunshine.
The single varieties are raised by seed, which must be sown as soon as ripe in pans or shallow boxes, which should be filled with light rich, sandy loam, kept moist, and sheltered in a frame throughout the winter. Germination is very slow and the young plants will not appear till the end of September. Keep the seedlings in their seed-boxes, freely ventilated to prevent damping off, and in April remove them to a sheltered shady border. As the young plants make their proper leaves, carefully lift them out with a thin slip of wood and plant them in a border prepared for the purpose, where the soil must be sweet and sandy, without manure and a little shaded.

Habitat

Cooler latitudes of the North Temperate Zone

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The Hepatica Americana of De Candolle is the Hepatica triloba of Wildenow. This is a perennial plant, the root of which consists of numerous strong fibres. The  leaves  are all radical, on long, hairy petioles, with three ovate, obtuse or rounded entire lobes, smooth evergreen, coriaceous, cordate at base, the new ones appearing later than the flowers.
     
The  flowers  appear almost as soon as the snow leaves the ground in the Spring. They are single, generally blue, sometimes white and flesh color, and are nodding at first, then erect, on hairy scales three or four inches long; by cultivation they become double; involucre simple, composed of three entire, ovate, obtuse bracts, resembling a calyx, situated a little below the flower.  Calyx  of two or three rows of petaloid sepals;  stamens  awl - shaped,  anthers  elliptic,  achenia  ovate, acute, awnless.