Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Nuphar luteum

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Botanical uses– The dried root was and is ground to a meal and used in soups, stews and flour. It was also given to stock as a feed.

Yellow pond lily was an important medicinal plant for Aboriginal Peoples. Thompson Peoples mixed dry powdered leaves with bear grease to make and ointment for infections, bites and swellings. Sliced dried roots were chewed for ulcers. Tsimshian peoples boiled the heart of the rootstock and ate it for bleeding lungs and as a contraceptive. Other groups used the root to treat tuberculosis. European folk also used yellow pond lily as a medicine. Seeds were gathered and eaten by coastal peoples south of British Columbia. The starchy root is reported to be edible, but in my experience you can boil it as many times as you want, it remains bitter and very tough. (Richard Hebda, Yellow Pond Lily, (Nuphar luteum) )

Traditional uses – The root is astringent, demulcent and anodyne. It has been used in dysentery, gonorrhoea and leucorrhoea. The leaves and roots have been used as a poultice for boils and inflamed skin, while an infusion has been used as a gargle for oral and pharyngeal ulcers.
It was an important medicinal plant for Aboriginal peoples. Thompson peoples mixed dry powdered leaves with grease to make an ointment for infections, bites and swellings. Tsimshian peoples boiled the heart of the rootstock and ate it for bleeding lungs and as a contraceptive. Other groups used the root to treat tuberculosis (Richard Hebda)
The Lakota Nation boiled the roots for eating.
The Iroquois used a compound decoction for swollen lungs and pain between the shoulder blades: also, men used this for epilepsy.
They also used a compound decoction as a febrifuge.
The Iroquois also used a compound infusion of dried roots for blood diseases, and to dry up smallpox.
The infusion was used cold as a “Ghost “medicine.
An infusion of dried, grated plant was taken for heart trouble
A poultice of roots or a decoction was taken and used as a wash for a swollen abdomen.        
European and other people used it also as a medicine.
Paracelsus praised it as a remedy for affections of the uterus and called it  a “coagulitivum”. A French preparation of Nuphar flowers, “Eau de Nenuphar” was traded as an anaphrodisiac.

The tuberous rhizomes have been used for tanning purposes and fed to stock. The seeds can be roasted like popcorn. (Vermeulen Synoptic 2)


---Medicinal Action and Uses---The root is astringent, demulcent, anodyne, and antiscrofulous, used in dysentery, diarrhoea,gonorrhoea, and leucorrhoea externally. The leaves and roots have been used in form of poultice to boils, tumours, scrofulous ulcers and inflamed skin; the infusion is used as a gargle for ulcers in the mouth and throat.

---Dosage---The powdered root, 1/2 drachm. Infusion up to 2 fluid ounces.

The virtues of the root are quickly imparted to water.

A poultice of leaves and roots relieves boils, tumours, ulcers, and inflamed skin. A complete cure of uterine cancer by a decoction and a vaginal injection is recorded.

The dose of the powdered root is 1/2 drachm in milk or sweetened water; but the best form is an infusion of 1 OZ. in a pint of boiling water, macerated for thirty minutes, of which 2 to 4 fluid ounces may be given three or four times a day.