Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Robinia pseudoacacia

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In pharmacology the blooms, called Flores Pseudacaciae were applied as an antispasomdic. A tea made out of  the blooms is used for cough. The blooms in alcohol are regarded as a gout remedy.  The leaves of the tree were recommended also in the veterinarian medicine for horse diseases. The seeds find their use as coffee surrogate. In America, a syrup with strong narcotic qualities is said to be produced from the husks of the seeds. By inhaling the dust, which comes up while working with the wood, as well as by eating the seeds and chewing the roots, poisonings, partially with deadly exit,  were seen frequently. The very resistant wood is suitable particularly the construction of roads or under water, furthermore it also can be used for coloring.

Medicinal Uses
Antispasmodic; Antiviral; Aromatic; Cholagogue; Diuretic; Emetic; Emollient; Febrifuge; Laxative; Narcotic; Purgative; Tonic.
Febrifuge[13, 46].

The flowers are antispasmodic, aromatic, diuretic, emollient and laxative[218]. They are cooked and eaten for the treatment of eye ailments[218].

The inner bark and the rootbark are emetic, purgative and tonic[4, 7, 218, 257]. The rootbark has been chewed to induce vomiting, or held in the mouth to allay toothache[222, 257], though it is rarely if ever prescribed as a therapeutic agent in Britain[4].

The fruit is narcotic[13]. This probably refers to the seedpod.

The leaves are cholagogue and emetic[7]. The leaf juice inhibits viruses[218].

Other Uses
Dye; Essential; Fibre; Fuel; Soil stabilization; Wood.
A drying oil is obtained from the seed[2, 7].

An essential oil is obtained from the flowers. Highly valued, it is used in perfumery[7, 57, 100].

A yellow dye is obtained from the bark[223]. The bark contains tannin, but not in sufficient quantity for utilization[223]. On a 10% moisture basis, the bark contains 7.2% tannin and the heartwood of young trees 5.7%[223].

The bark is used to make paper and is a substitute for silk and wool[13].

Trees sucker freely, especially if coppiced, and they can be used for stabilizing banks etc[200, 226].

Wood - close-grained, exceedingly hard, heavy, very strong, resists shock and is very durable in contact with the soil. It weighs 45lb per cubic foot and is used in shipbuilding and for making fence posts, treenails, floors etc[4, 7, 11, 13, 46, 61, 82, 149, 171, 227]. A very good fuel[82], but it should be used with caution because it flares up and projects sparks[226].




Flowers -

cooked. A fragrant aroma, they are used in making jams and pancakes[7, 183]. They can also be made into a pleasant drink[183].


Other Uses

Dye; Essential; Fibre; Fuel; Soil stabilization; Wood.
A drying oil is obtained from the seed[2, 7].

An essential oil is obtained from the flowers. Highly valued, it is used in perfumery[7, 57, 100].

A yellow dye is obtained from the bark[223]. The bark contains tannin, but not in sufficient quantity for utilization[223]. On a 10% moisture basis, the bark contains 7.2% tannin and the heartwood of young trees 5.7%[223].

The bark is used to make paper and is a substitute for silk and wool[13].

Trees sucker freely, especially if coppiced, and they can be used for stabilizing banks etc[200, 226].

Wood - close-grained, exceedingly hard, heavy, very strong, resists shock and is very durable in contact with the soil. It weighs 45lb per cubic foot and is used in shipbuilding and for making fence posts, treenails, floors etc[4, 7, 11, 13, 46, 61, 82, 149, 171, 227]. A very good fuel[82], but it should be used with caution because it flares up and projects sparks[226].

Robinia pseudacacia. False Acacia. Locust tree. N.O. Leguminosae.
     A noble tree from North America now naturalised in many parts of Europe, especially the southern Alps where it has become an important timber tree. One of the first American species to be imported to Europe, a seed of this tree was planted by Jean Robin [hence the name Robinia], herbalist to Henry IV of France, in 1601 in Paris. That same tree is still alive.
     Robinia has a deeply furrowed bark, soft green leaflets and short pendulous racemes of fragrant white flowers. The fast-growing tree is broadly shaped and can reach a height of 25 metres. In Hungary it was extensively used to reforest the steppes and became the national tree and the symbol of the country. The tree is greatly valued for the way it holds damp soil together and for its apiculture. One typical feature is that heat or rain makes the leaves turn upward along the stems. Another characteristic is that at night the leaves adopt a sort of sleeping position by folding themselves alongside the branches.
     The timber has been extensively used for ship-building, and is largely used in the construction of the wooden pins called tree nails. Instead of decaying, it acquires an extraordinary degree of hardness with time. The strong-smelling flowers are used in the perfume industry.
     The inner bark contains a poisonous protein substance, robin, which possesses strong emetic and purgative properties. It is capable of coagulating the casein of milk and of clotting the red corpuscles of certain animals.