Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Rubus idaeus

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Rubus idaeus

Etymology

Rubus = red in Latin
Idaeus = Mount Ida where it was very common

Family

Traditional name

Common names. Common Red Raspberry.
Raspbis. Hindberry. Bramble of Mount Ida.  
(Danish) Hindebar.  (Dutch) Braamboss.  (German) Hindbur.   (Saxon) Hindbeer. Lampone (Italian)

Used parts

Trituration of the fresh buds.

Classification

Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Rosiflorae / Rosidae; Rosales; Rosaceae - Rose Family

Keywords

crat-like

Original proving

Description of the substance

The well-known Raspberry, grown so largely for its fruit, grows wild in some parts of Great Britain. It is a native of many parts of Europe. The stems are erect and shrubby, biennial, with creeping perennial roots. It flowers in May and June.

The plant is generally propagated by suckers, though those raisedfrom layers should be preferred, because they will be better rooted and not so liable to send out suckers. In preparing these plants their fibres should be shortened, but the buds which are placed at a small distance from the stem of the plant must not be cut off, as they produce the new shoots the following summer. Place the plants about 2 feet apart in the rows, allowing 4 or 5 feet between the rows. If planted too closely, without plenty of air between the rows, the fruit will not be so fine.

The most suitable soil is a good, strong loam. They do not thrive so well in a light soil.

In October, cut down all the old wood that has produced fruit in the summer and shorten the young shoots to about 2 feet in length. Dig the spaces between the rows well and dress with a little manure. Beyond weeding during the summer, no further care is needed. It is wise to form new plantations every three or four years, as the fruit on old plants is apt to deteriorate.

The Wild Raspberry differs from the cultivated variety mainly in its size.

Botanical description.

Rubus Idaeus. This plant grows to a height of 6 feet. The young branches are glaucous, somewhat bristly and spinous, with odd-pinnate leaves, bearing 1, 2, or 3 pairs of serrate, ovate, sessile, whitish, pubescent leaflets. The flower-petals are white, about the length of the calyx-lobes, and 5 in number. The plant is believed to be derived from the following plant. [King's American Dispensatory]

This plant grows to a height of 6 feet. The young branches are glaucous, somewhat bristly and spinous, with odd-pinnate leaves, bearing 1, 2, or 3 pairs of serrate, ovate, sessile, whitish, pubescent leaflets. The flower-petals are white, about the length of the calyx-lobes, and 5 in number. (http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/eclectic/kings/rubus.html)

There are probably 250 species of this genus occurring around the Northern Hemisphere, and all are potentially edible. They are mostly trailing shrubs with thorny emergences along the stem and leaf axes, and often times these plants are collectively referred to as brambles. Raspberries are generally propagated via suckers. In nature the canes become layered and root easily, but plants also spread by creeping perennial roots. Sharp projections do not stop us from harvesting the delicious, sweet fruits, which are a type of aggregate fruit. Each one of the juicy spheres comprising a raspberry is a small drupe that developed from one of the pistils in the flower, so this is in reality an aggregate of drupelets (quite a mouthful)! The origins of the species and the many horticultural forms are very complex, and involved hybridization and polyploidy, all too confusing to present here. Even the pure form of raspberry, Rubus idaeus, normally red, can have white or yellow forms. Other fruits from this genus include black raspberry, boysenberry, dewberry, wineberry (Japanese), loganberry, tayberry, and so forth. Realize only that none of these is truly a berry in a botanical sense--they are drupes. (http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Rubus)

Habitat.

Labrador to British Columbia, south to West Virginia, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Wyoming. (http://www.yale.edu/fes505b/redrasp.html)

 The well-known Raspberry, grown so largely for its fruit, grows wild in some parts of Great Britain. It is a native of many parts of Europe. The stems are erect and shrubby, biennial, with creeping perennial roots. It flowers in May and June. [A Modern Herbal; Mrs. M. Grieve]


Rubus Idaeus, or cultivated raspberry, is indigenous to Europe and to Asia, eastward to Japan, where the red raspberry is likewise found. The Red raspberry grows wild, and is common to Canada and the northern United States, growing in hedges, neglected fields, thickets, and hills, flowering in May, and ripening its fruit from June to August. The U. S. P. describes Rubus Idaeus fruit as follows: "Deprived of the conical receptacle, and, therefore, hollow at the base; hemispherical, red, finely hairy, composed of from 20 to 30 coalesced, small drupes, each one crowned with the withered style; juice red; of an agreeable odor, and a pleasant, acidulous taste. The closely allied, light-red fruit of Rubus strigosus, Michaux, and the purplish-black fruit of Rubus occidentalis, LinnÈ, may be employed in place of the above"-(U. S. P.). The Rubus occidentalis is the Black raspberry, or Thimbleberry, common in waste places and fence corners from Canada to Georgia, and west. Its fruit is inferior to that of the preceding varieties. [King's American Dispensatory]

Raspberries are grown in backyards and gardens throughout most of the United States, because fruits can be produced just about anywhere, but commercial production is concentrated where the climate is not too cold in the winter but summers are relatively cool. Oregon, northern California, Washington, and southern British Columbia (especially near Abbotsford) are where most red raspberries (R. idaeus) are produced. (http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Rubus)