Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Rubus villlosus

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Rubus villosus

Etymology

Family

Traditional name

Other names. Nigrobaccus, and R. Cuneifolius.

Common name. Blackberry. Brombeere. Bramble, or Fingerberry.

Used parts

Homeopathic preparation.

Mother tincture of the bark of the root. (Blackwood's Manual)

Classification

N.O. Rosaceae

Keywords

crat-like

Original proving

Description of the substance

Botanical description.


Rubus villosus is a perennial, half shrubby plant, pubescent and prickly. Its root is woody, knotty, and horizontal, and sends up a tall, branching, slender, prickly, more or less furrowed and angular stem, recurved at top, and from 3 to 6 feet high. The leaves are mostly in threes, sometimes fives, often solitary, on a channeled, hairy petiole; leaflets ovate, acuminate, sharply and unequally serrate, covered with scattered hairs above, and with a thick, soft pubescence underneath; terminal stalked; 2 side ones sessile; petiole and back of the midrib commonly armed with short, recurved prickles. Branchlets, stalks, and lower surface of the leaves hairy and glandular; leaflets from 2 1/2 to 4 inches long, by 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches wide. Flowers large, in erect racemes, with a hairy, prickly stalk; pedicels slender, 1 or 2 inches long, with glandular hairs and lanceolate bracts. Petals 5, white, ovate or oblong, concave, contracted into a short claw at base. Calyx short, with ovate, hairy segments, ending in an acuminate point, or a lanceolate leaflet. Stamens numerous, inserted on the calyx along with the petals; filaments slender; anthers small. The fruit is large, at first green, then red, and, when matured, black; it consists of about 20 roundish, shining, black, fleshy carpels, closely collected into an ovate or oblong head, subacid, well flavored, and ripening in August and September (L.—W-G.).
Rubus canadensis, sometimes called Low or Creeping blackberry, has a slender, prickly stem, procumbent, or trailing several yards upon the ground. The leaves are petiolate, of three (or pedately 5 or 7) leaflets, which are elliptical, or rhomboidal-oval, acute, thin, membranaceous, sharply and unequally cut-serrate, often somewhat incised, somewhat pubescent, 1 to 1 1/2 inches long, and about one-half as wide. The flowers are large, white, nearly solitary, on slender, elongated, prickly, somewhat corymbed pedicels, with leafy bracts; lower peduncles distant; upper crowded. Petals obovate and twice as long as the calyx. The fruit is large, black, very sweet, and juicy (W.—T.—G).
Rubus trivialis, or Low-bush blackberry, of the southern states (Southern dewberry), has a procumbent, shrubby stem, armed with both prickles and bristles. The leaves are trifoliate, or pedately 5-parted, evergreen, leathery, and almost smooth. The leaflets are sharply serrate, and of the ovate-oblong or lanceolate form. Flowers large, and from 1 to 3 to the peduncles. They blossom in March. [King's American Dispensatory]


Rubus villosus is a perennial, half shrubby plant, pubescent and prickly. Its root is woody, knotty, and horizontal, and sends up a tall, branching, slender, prickly, more or less furrowed and angular stem, recurved at top, and from 3 to 6 feet high. The leaves are mostly in threes, sometimes fives, often solitary, on a channeled, hairy petiole; leaflets ovate, acuminate, sharply and unequally serrate, covered with scattered hairs above, and with a thick, soft pubescence underneath; terminal stalked; 2 side ones sessile; petiole and back of the midrib commonly armed with short, recurved prickles. Branchlets, stalks, and lower surface of the leaves hairy and glandular; leaflets from 2 1/2 to 4 inches long, by 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches wide. Flowers large, in erect racemes, with a hairy, prickly stalk; pedicels slender, 1 or 2 inches long, with glandular hairs and lanceolate bracts. Petals 5, white, ovate or oblong, concave, contracted into a short claw at base. Calyx short, with ovate, hairy segments, ending in an acuminate point, or a lanceolate leaflet. Stamens numerous, inserted on the calyx along with the petals; filaments slender; anthers small. The fruit is large, at first green, then red, and, when matured, black; it consists of about 20 roundish, shining, black, fleshy carpels, closely collected into an ovate or oblong head, subacid, well flavored, and ripening in August and September (L.-W-G.).(http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/eclectic/kings/rubus.html)


Habitat.

United States.

 

The Dewberry grows wild in dry, stony fields, gravelly soil, and neglected grounds, and is common from Canada to Virginia, flowering in May, and ripening its fruit in July and August. The root is the official part; it is generally smaller than the blackberry root, with its external covering transversely cracked, of a dark, brownish-gray color, odorless, and woody internally. The Southern dewberry blooms in March, and matures its fruit in May. It is found in sandy soils from Virginia to Florida,, and from thence westward. Blackberry grows abundantly in most parts of the. United States, in old fields, by the roadside, and on the borders of thickets, flowering from May to July and maturing its fruit in August. The bark of the root is the part used. As demanded by the U. S. P., it is "in thin, tough, flexible bands, outer surface blackish, or blackish-gray, inner surface pale-brownish, sometimes with strips of whitish, tasteless wood adhering; inodorous; taste strongly astringent, somewhat bitter"—(U. S. P.).


Of the genus Rubus a large number are indigenous in the United States, where they are called Blackberry, Dewberry, Cloudberry.  (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/blabea50.html)