Substances & Homeopatic Remedies

Zizia aurea

Requests: If you need specific information on this remedy - e.g. a proving or a case info on toxicology or whatsoever, please post a message in the Request area www.homeovision.org/forum/ so that all users may contribute.


Carum aureum, Bentham and Hooker.
Thapsium aureum, Nut. (Smyrnium aureum, Linn; Zizia aurea, Koch).

Etymology

Family

Traditional name

Meadow Parsnip
Golden alexanders
Syn:
Thapsium aureum, Carum aureum, Meadow Parsnip

Used parts

Tincture of root.

Classification

Plantae; Spermatophyta, Angiospermae - Flowering Plants; Dicotyledonae; Rosiflorae / Rosidae; Apiales; Umbelliferae / Apiaceae - Carrot / Celery Family; genus; Zizia; species; aurea.

Keywords

Original proving

Proven by Dr. E. Marcy in 1855.

Description of the substance

Perennial herb, growing by moist river banks, flowering in June. Stem branched, one to two alternately divided or parted [or rarely some of the root-leaves simple and heart-shaped], the divisions or leaflets oblong-lanceolate, very sharply cut, serrate, with a wedge-shaped, entire base. Flowers deep yellow; fruit oblong, oval, with ten-winged ridges. The whole plant is glabrous. The root is from two to four inches long, not larger than the little finger, distinctly and rather deeply yellow internally; externally brown. It has, when fresh, a strong, unpleasant, and rather nauseating odour, not unlike that of Conium. It has an aromatic, pungent taste, remaining long in the mouth, and is disagreeable and loathsome to the stomach.

Physical Characteristics
Perennial growing to 0.75m. It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from May to June.
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects. o Flower size: in flat-topped cluster 2 inches across
o Flower color: yellow

The plant is self-fertile. We rate it 2 out of 5 for usefulness.
Note the divided leaves with toothed edges. These distinguish golden alexanders from similar plants.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Habitats and Possible Locations
Eastern N. America - Quebec to Saskatchewan and south to Texas and Florida..
Woodland, Sunny Edge.
Moist meadowland[200]. Dry woods and rocky outcrops[222].

Cultivation details
Requires a moist soil and a position in full sun[200].

Suitable for the wild garden and other informal plantings as well as collections of native wild flowers[200].

Propagation

Seed - we have no information for this species but it is probably best sown in spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

...............................................................................................................

Botanical Description.

This is a perennial herb, growing by moist river banks, flowering in June.  Stem  branched, one to two alternately divided or parted (or rarely some of the root - leaves simple and heart - shaped), the divisions or leaflets oblong - lanceolate, very sharply cut, serrate, with a wedge - shaped, entire base.  Flowers  deep yellow; fruit oblong, oval, with ten - winged ridges. The whole plant is glabrous. The  root  is from two to four inches long, not larger than the little finger, distinctly and rather deeply yellow internally; externally brown. It has, when fresh, a strong, unpleasant, and rather nauseating odor, not unlike that of Conium. It has an aromatic, pungent taste, remaining long in the mouth, and is disagreeable and loathsome to the stomach.